Poor Tiger Woods

Man, the media just will not stop about reporting Tiger Woods. Ah, so typical.

As all of us hearing about the news, it is so easy for us to judge, to criticize, and to draw defaming conclusions about Tiger Woods. It is soooooooooo easy for us to call him immoral. What’s the fun in that? So instead of all that, let us look at the news from another angle.

Let’s say you were in the exact positions of Tiger Woods. With his great golf skill, fame, money, look… and thus finally [and most likely] the admirations of many ladies. Given all that, and then given the opportunities, to sleep and have affairs with beautiful women. And perhaps sometimes seriously seduced. Can you with utmost honesty answer that you would not had done the same?

Now, you do not really NEED to answer that. And you may think I am, but I am not trying to defend Tiger Woods either.

But if you answered with “NO!!” right the way, you probably hadn’t given it sincere thought and thus miss the point of what I wanted to say.

The point I am trying to get at is the why for which we need to ask ourselves such question.

And this is not so different than the question, “What is the sound of a one-handed clap?”

Originally posted 2009-12-15 00:09:12. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

If You Don’t Use It, You Lose It

In the past two years as I learned fitness/exercise/gym as a habit, one thing that is very pertinent in life is that – If you don’t use it, you lose it.

One doesn’t have to be a kinesiology major to understand that. My experience has been that even if it has just been a week of inactivity, I notice a deline in my weight training (very obvious) or cardiovascular performance. How do I tell? The answer is the amount of soreness I can feel. Even more obvious is the immense soreness + pain whenever I start some new training. And hence, the need for us to emphasize on consistency of exercise. To avoid the benefits that we have worked so hard to archieve, it’s best to continue to do something at least, even just to maintain a moderate level of the benefits. In addition…

The idea of “If you don’t use it, you lose it” does not only apply to fitness and health. On my path of exploring and learning singing myself, I continuously discovered that many of the causes for my difficulty to produce more beautiful tone are muscular apathy of head/facial area muscles. It is over time when I consciously practice these muscles that I am able to improve.

Actually, not only is this the problem for people trying to learn how to sing, but this is the problem for people between ethnic group learning a foreign tongue. Certain languages only require us to use certain facial muscles. It is one of the many reasons that when we try to learn a new language that we have difficulty with announciation. What we need to do is to practice using all the muscles on our face :)

Well, another thing is that us humans have a tendency to be lazy and use less, or just enough, muscle to perform a certain task. That is exactly why we need to re-learn deep breathing for our health, and also exercise our mind to maintain our mental sharpness, and of course, exercise our body to make sure we don’t lose those muscle.

In fact, I would go as far to say that everything in our body is governed by this concept of “If you don’t use it, you lose it”. Therefore, everyday we need to consciously use every part of our body and push it to improve, expand, and realize our potentials!

Originally posted 2007-05-02 23:01:12. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Living Simply

A simple idea in itself.
Keeping life simple in all aspects.
At least that should be the first step before you move on to more complicated things.

Like when you are young, you instinctly learn all the basic abilities for everyday life until death.
Like when you want to learn martial arts, dancing, or fencing, you want to drill the footwork into your body.
Like when you get your financial situation under control, you start by looking at your income and expense.
Like when you want to get healthy, you start by looking at what you feed and how you are using your body.
Like when you solve any problem, you want to find the one fundamental aspect of yourself that is the root of the problem in order to stay focus.

Yet, humans often overlook these simple things before moving on to complicated ones.
It’s like running without first learning how to walk.
People want the result in one quick step.
Shortcuts usually lead to more troubles.
That is what create majority of turmoils in our lives.

Oh simple things…

Originally posted 2008-10-07 00:09:27. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

About Robert Kiyosaki and Rich Dad, Poor Dad

It is safe to say that almost everyone knows, has heard of, or has read the book “Rich Dad and Poor Dad” by Robert Kiyosaki. I myself read the book about 2 years ago. Before I introduce what other people have said about Robert Kiyosaki and his book, let me briefly mention my opinion.

The Good Stuff

  • Encouragement for people to change their mentality and to a paradigm shift in financial thinking — This is a big plus because not being trapped in a narrow perspective and having the right mentality is the first step to do anything right.
  • The importance of passive income — It is necessary to set yourself up with passive income to become financially secure and get rich faster.
  • The mentioning of various financial concepts — I classify this as good stuff because this introduces people to new concepts and therefore, motivates and intrigues people to go out and learn about them. I became more apt to go study how the market and personal finance works. Financial knowledge and literacy is essential for financial security.

The Bad Stuff

  • The mentioning of various financial concepts — I also classify this as bad stuff because I believe he either exaggerates in his stories or provides misleading information. In a few places, he seems to be nearly promoting illegal behaviors.
  • Strong opposition to formal education — I believe formal insitutions still have their practical values and useful knowledges depending on how much individuals make use of the experience. It is detrimental to discourage and turn people away from academia.
  • Negligence to mention or explain the risk in the entrepreneur endeavors that he advocates readers to do — From what I read in news, this has led people to take reckless financial actions leading to financial disasters. I am not holding him responsible because people should think for themselves, but as an author of a “financial book”, he should provide the full picture and cover the topic of risk somewhere… especially in the high-risk financial maneuver he tells people to do.
  • Many vague areas in his stories — This makes me wonder how many of his “successful business” stories are true, and that he created them just to boaster himself and to help sell the book.

In short, I think the book is good in that it incurs people to think about their own finance and to do something about it. It is bad because of possibly misleading, false, and incomplete information, which can lead to dangerous and disastrous consequence if read incorrectly. That’s all from me. Below is what other people have said.

John T. Reed’s analysis of Robert T. Kiyosaki’s book Rich Dad, Poor Dad – I read this VERY detail research and analysis on Robert Kiyosaki and his book recently. Together with the vagueness that I personally noticed in his book, we need to remain skeptical of this man and his words.

Let’s Read Some of Robert Kiyosaki’s Drivel – Silly words spoken by Robert Kiyosaki. This teaches us to do our own research and be cautious and skeptical about advice from “financial advisor”.

Kiyosaki is a Liar? – More “interesting things” said by Robert Kiyosaki!

Rich Dad, Poor Dad :: review – Brian and I agree on the positive points in Rich Dad, Poor Dad.

Book Review: Rich Dad, Poor Dad – Concise review on the book stating the good and the bad.

Cautions on “Rich Dad” Robert Kiyosaki – Frugal talks more about things we need to be careful about the author and his book. He then talks about his view on how to obtain wealth and the importance of formal education.

Robert Kiyosaki, A Smart Investor? – Once again, you probably should not take Robert Kiyosaki seriously when he advises you how to invest. Let’s just keep him as someone who may inspire people to think differently.

Deconstructing Robert Kiyosaki – Trent provides insights into the kind of man who he thinks Robert Kiyosaki is.

Review: Rich Dad, Poor Dad – Full book review by Trent.

It seems that people generally agree on the few ideas Robert Kiyosaki has done correctly on his book, and they also agree on the same skeptical things. It’s probably enough Robert Kiyosaki for one day.

Originally posted 2007-09-20 23:41:10. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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