Poor Rich People

I had the thought of naming this post the poor rich bastards… well, I didn’t and now you know anyways :)

There were lots of talk about increasing taxes on the rich, a battle between classes, 1% of the nation owning most of the money, all that jazz.

It is always my fascination to re-examine idea that is common sense, and we should take a look at the word “rich”.

Dictionary.com says that rich means “having wealth or great possessions; abundantly supplied with resources, means, or funds; wealthy,” and when we say somebody is rich, it simply means “that dude has a f load of money.”

There is a reason I called the rich people poor in the title. Because I have come up with another meaning for the word rich.

Rich means having more than enough.

The tricky part becomes, a person is rich only when a person knows what enough means to himself in various aspects — financially, materially, physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually.

Quite obviously, we can observe few, if any, of the people we called rich know what it means to be enough, demonstrated by their behaviors of hoarding more and more, be it money or power and let alone the other aspects where those people either have the faintest idea or simply don’t give a crap. Same can be said about those called poor.

As something Bill Maher said (paraphrase), “Americans would do anything and everything, to oneself and to others, for money.” Well, maybe not everyone, but definitely enough people do not know “enough” to fall into that definition.

Oh, these poor bastards.

The rich can be poor.
The poor can be rich.
Of course, rich can be rich and poor can be poor too.

Originally posted 2011-01-10 00:20:04. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

10 Rules Piggy Lives by Financially

10 rules that I live by in financial aspect (I didn’t know I could come up with 10, yay!):

  1. Spend less than what you make.
  2. Use credit cards wisely – pay off credit card bills each month, make use of 0% APR offer for financing, use reward cards that accumulate points or have % cash back.
  3. Pay off “bad” debt – this includes any high interest rate debt that is not tax deductible, which is credit card debt for most people (there are pay-day loans which should be avoided at all cost anyways because of outrageous interest).
  4. Contribute to and fully utilize 401k – Most employers provide 401k these days, so contribute some or at least the % of employer matching (free money!) but also educate yourself of the available funds and pick wisely (hence the “fully utilize” part).
  5. Contribute regularly to saving.
  6. Develop your own investment portfolio – whether it be individual stocks or funds, but educate yourself first and invest in a style that suits you. I said “your own” because you should never just follow what others do because our needs, situations, and personalities are all different, so understanding yourself is essential here.
  7. Have a spending budget – this allows you to afford hobbies, gadgets, travelling, etc.
  8. Distinguish “want” vs. “need” – this is the most important to keep myself from spending too much because of how I LOOOOOOOOVE gadgets :)
  9. Invest in ourselves – classes, books, or things that contribute to our general well-being.
  10. Remember the ultimate goal – a reminder to be frugal and financial-smart but yet not becoming cheap :) In other words, balance is everything.

Originally posted 2007-04-12 21:40:49. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What If You Receive 1 Million Dollars…

Or 5 million dollars, or 10 million dollars… It doesn’t really matter. The point is, let’s assume you receive a certain amount of money that provides you financial independence for the rest of your life.

What would you do?

First, why don’t you take a look at today’s market. See how far it’s plunged. 360 points! Everyone who has 401k and stock portfolio can probably feel it, ouch! For those of us looking at long term, it maybe less relevant, but nonetheless, my net worth is taking the hit temporarily.

The reason I mentioned that… Sometimes I feel this uncontrolled impatience inside myself. I’ll look at the amount in my saving, in brokerage, and then the amount of my loan. I look at my net worth, and I feel that it’s just not growing fast enough. I save, I invest, I contribute to 401k with discipline each month, but it’s still not growing fast enough for my patience. I want to be financially independent today. I want to be done. I want to be out of the rat race right now. And honestly? Don’t we all.

Though, I brought myself back to reality, back to my calm self and without losing sight. I think about what I would do if I do receive the money that enables my financial independence, be it 1mil, 5mil, 10mil, or 1bil…

Now I have hobbies, and quite a few of them. I have things I like doing. I want to help people. But as far as what exactly I want to do with the freedom and all those time that comes with the financial independence, I cannot say I am 100% certain, which is okay because I need go through what I am going through. The experience will continuously let me better understand the world around me and learn about myself. Only with such experience, I am what I am today and what I will be. And also more appreciative I shall be when the moment arrives. That’s why, I am and will continue to do my best, and there is no hurry. Enjoying and being in each moment, including this process, is important. There is no better place and moment to be.

As the saying goes (vaguely as I can remember it):
Every moment you spent wishing to be somewhere else is a moment of your life wasted.

Originally posted 2007-11-01 22:47:01. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

The Idea of Sunk Cost and Letting Go

Sunk cost is a most important idea I learned in a Decision Analysis class. In “technical” terms, sunk costs are costs that had already been incurred that is irrecoverable.

Why is this so important?

Sunk cost is an indispensable idea that enables you to have rational thinking and to make rational decision, and rational thinking and rational decision are what you need to prevail in many areas in life, such as investing, making business decision, deciding the next move in relationship/career/life, etc.

In a practical example of whether to sell your car, you can:

  1. Compare current selling price with how much you paid for the car and think about the loss (the difference) if you sell the car now. If the loss is too big, you keep the car.
  2. Think about how much you gain by selling (maybe use that toward a more fuel-economical car) and/or the maintenance and insurance you DON’T have to pay later, which will lead to more saving. And if those gain and savings do not provide more value than not selling, you will keep the car.

Now I didn’t cover every aspects and parameters involved in the decision of car-selling in real-life, but you get the idea.
Which do you think is a rational decision?

In the 1st scenario, you let something that has already happened in the past to drive your decision.
In the 2nd scenario, you consider all future potentials and base you decision upon those.
Pretty obvious.

The price you paid for the car is no longer relevant. However, you can imagine how people will choose not to sell like in the 1st scenario in real life.

Quickly, we can translate the same idea into making decisions in a business project and a personal relationship setting.

Instead of deciding whether a project should be continued with focus on how much money and human resources had been invested, you need to focus on how much potential investment return if the project is to be finished, the probability of the project failing, and how much more cost will be incurred, etc. You do not focus on those “wasted” resources because they are already sunk cost.

Now in terms of personal relationship, instead of deciding if you should stay with somebody based on the amount of time and effort spent, you evaluate about the current trust/confidence/comfort level you have with this person (that is a result of past experience, but NOT the past experience), the potential amount of happiness/sadness, whether he/she can change bad habits or if you can endure them, and many many other aspects involved in a intimate relationship looking into the future.

Those are just some very generic examples. But to put in more generic term of how sunk cost assist you to be more rational is that “what happened has happened and you should not let yourself get dragged down by the past”. I’m am not urging you to be completely rational and throw away the past, but it’s age-old wisdom that you do not let the past becomes the burden of future, especially the mistakes and bad experience. This is the same idea as we tell each other to “let go”.

Look into the future and based your decisions on those visions, my friends.

To have all the details and technicality on the idea of sunk cost, visit here.

Originally posted 2007-09-10 23:29:07. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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